What Types Of Interviews Can I Expect?

Today I’m here to help you understand the different methods you may encounter when it comes to interviews. You may have been interviewed 100 times, 10 times or 0 times before, but the truth is, you never really know what’s going to happen! 

In case you didn’t already know, there are actually several different types of interviews you may have thrown at you in life.

I’ve been interviewed many times for different things (and I’ve also interviewed people myself) so I feel like I’m in a good position to talk about this. Admittedly, interviews can be scary things, so I’m going to summarise them all for you! Thank me later.

 

The Telephone Interview

What is it?

A telephone interview is when you receive a call from the interviewer and answer questions over the phone.

What to expect?

So, the telephone interview is usually used as the ‘screening’ at the beginning of recruitment. As you’ve probably guessed, you’re asked questions over a phone call - a lot of people find it preferable because it can be less nerve wracking than meeting someone face to face - although, that’s not true for everyone. Being asked questions over the phone can make you feel a bit ‘on the spot’.

How to smash it

My main advice would be:

  • Remember, they CANNOT see you! They will not see you going red, so don’t worry- chill out.

  • Have notes in front of you! Research the company, specific role and popular interview questions beforehand and make notes for yourself to look at in case you get stuck.

What will the interviewer want?

The interviewer will expect you to keep a good flow - listen well, then reply. Relax and talk clearly. Oh, and please charge your phone before. Your battery dying mid-sentence won’t be ideal!

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Face to Face Interviews

What is it?

A face-to-face interview is when you meet up with an interviewer, usually at the designated place of work, and answer questions from them.

What to expect?

A traditional face-to-face interview is probably the most common type of interview. It sounds scary, but once you’re in there and chatting away, you’ll feel more relaxed. Usually it’ll be 1-2 interviewers to 1 interviewee, taking turns to ask questions. Depending on the company you’re interviewing for, questions can range in topics - it’s best to do some research beforehand to get a feel for their values, ethos and what they’re looking for.

How to smash it

Being confident even when you’re not feeling it is key - sometimes, you’ve got to fake it until you make it. Breathe, make sure you’re prepared and relax - you’ve got this!

What will the interviewer want?

The interviewer will definitely be wanting clear and well-thought out answers. Sometimes, less is more! Don’t forget the basics, either - make sure you’re looking smart and presentable, be enthusiastic and always arrive with time to spare.

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Work Trial/Trial Shift

What is it?

A work trial is when you go to the place of work and experience a typical day or shift there. It’s a chance for you to find out for sure whether this is a place you can see yourself working at, and similarly for the employer to see if you have what it takes.

What to expect?

Sometimes, being thrown in at the deep end is the best way to learn. Depending on the company you’re trialling for, it could be very different - for example, a shop or a restaurant might ask you to come in for a few hours to experience a shift. Or, if you’re going for an office-based job, they may invite you in to experience a typical day there.

How to smash it

Remain confident and never feel afraid to ask questions. Everyone will build an opinion of you throughout the day - be on game as soon as you walk through the door. Get stuck in to anything that’s thrown at you and show you can use your initiative.

What will the interviewer want?

You’ll want to show that you’re comfortable in the role they’re offering, but don’t worry - of course they’re not going to expect you to be an expert already. They’ll want to see you use your initiative, but will also appreciate you asking questions if necessary.

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Group Interview

What is it?

A group interview is when you’re interviewed in a group with other interviewees - the typical sizes of a group can vary.

What to expect?

If possible, ask the employer beforehand if it’s going to be a group interview. Nothing to worry about - it’s just a way for the company to screen multiple candidates in one go; they may include activities, games or just go round the group asking questions. Some people love them because they can feel more friendly and informal, whereas others dislike them because you might not get to say everything you wanted.

How to smash it

Make sure you get your say - smile and stand out! Show enthusiasm not only in yourself but in other people’s answers. That being said, don’t obviously try and take the lead - involve others whilst getting your voice heard.

What will the interviewer want?

Speak up, talk clearly and make clear and concise answers. The interviewer will want you to dive in and take part in everything you’re asked. Speak when it’s your turn and also allow others to have their say - staying attentive is important and it will show the interviewer that you work well in a team!

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Video Interview

What is it?

Well, it’s similar to a face-to-face interview, except it’s over a video call (such as Skype). This may be carried out if the business/interviewee are too far away from each other, or if someone is away.

What to expect?

Even though you’re not physically in person with the interviewer, act like you are! Don’t get distracted or lose focus, because it will be noticeable. Video interviews may sound daunting, but once you’re in the swing of it, you’ll feel more relaxed. They’ll seem less formal than a traditional face-to-face.

How to smash it

Don’t forget to show enthusiasm and speak clearly, as videos can be temperamental sometimes! Make sure your connection is good, and ensure you’re confident to use whatever method of video the interviewer wants to take (i.e. Skype, Facetime, Google Hangouts).

What will the interviewer want?

The interviewer will be looking for your ability to answer questions and chat just like you’re face to face. Give them your full attention at all times, and make sure you’re in a quiet, undisturbed place.

Online Assessment

What is it?

Sometimes known as ‘psychometric tests’, they’re online courses or quizzes that help the employer judge your personality, problem solving skills and abilities. They’re often used with jobs that have large application numbers, as it saves the time and energy of meeting hundreds of people.

What to expect?

Expect something fairly relaxed - it won’t usually be a speed test, so don’t worry about timings. You may have a problem solving activity to complete, a quiz or an assessment based on real-life ‘situations’ you may encounter on the job

How to smash it

Stay calm and don’t panic. The time given to complete them (if there even is an allowance) will always be generous, as it’s not a speed test! Relax and have a good think about your answers before submitting.

What will the interviewer want?

The interviewer (or ‘assessor’ in this case) will want to see that you’ve given concise answers, and that you’ve answered everything you’ve been asked. Staying attentive throughout is important as it’ll reflect in your answers and it will show the interviewer that you work well alone.

So, there we have it guys  - we’ve summarised the 4 main types of interviews! If you still aren’t sure about any of these interview methods and want some more guidance, feel free to email us at [email protected]

Dayna SpearComment